Rahil

Extending the Life of Super Smash Bros. Melee

07 October 2016

Sometime after watching some videos of Super Smash Bros. Melee (SSBM, Melee), I day-dreamed of a better version of Melee. There were more varied stages that fit the magical criteria of it being accepted by the community.

Then I imagined a mew2king combo someone off-stage in jungle japes, ending in a spike into a klaptrap, which was somehow DI’d and tech-jumped, running into yet another spike into a second klaptrap.

[I also imagined settings for turning on certain stage hazards, such as randall [the cloud], shy guys, and whispy, which all gives players a chance to interrupt combos or a chance at a recovery.]

Anyway, it would all be simple if Nintendo made the game open-source. Yet, 16 years later, not even an ounce of support for the competitive scene. In it’s stead, complete disregard and continued raking of capital through outdated proprietary hardware.

Perhaps Japan’s culture doesn’t value competition as much as family fun, but, when it’s as easy to do as pressing a button, the company’s reputation, in my mind, continues to fall over time. If this were a reputable company, say, Blizzard, this opportunity would have been immediately capitalized (taken advantage of). I can’t imagine any of the game programming to be special enough to be secret, so, I see no reason why not.

With some tweaks here and there, perhaps most of the stages, characters, [, items? stage hazards?] could be playable, resulting in more life without adding complexity (more information).

The result of ignoring and avoiding that decision has wasted much human labor through attempts to hack it and even using a sequel to the game to replicate it. So much human effort often is wasted due to simple decisions by the privileged and/or property-owners.

further browsing:
www.ssbwiki.com/Competitive_philosophy
smashboards.com/guides/competitive-philosophy-for-super-smash-bros.91/
– results from Googling “ssbm wiki philosophy”

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